WHY IT MATTERS

THE FACTS

Your voice matters.
For the first time in history, Latinos will be the largest
racial/ethnic minority voting bloc.

0 M

Latinos in the U.S. eligible to vote in the General Election.

0 M

Latinos in California eligible to vote. More than any other state in the country.

0 %

Of eligible Latino voters were registered to vote in 2018 in California.

0 PROPS

Will be on the Ballot in California. Justice will be on the Ballot on 2020.

Your Vote Makes a Difference!

Not only will your vote help determine who represents us in government; your vote will also help decide the outcomes on issues that matter to the Latino community in California!  

This year there are 12 propositions on the ballot. Voters will decide about funding for schools and local services, affirmative action in college admissions and hiring, and whether to let eligible 17-year-olds vote, among many other issues. Each of these issues will affect Latino youth and their families. We can let our voices be heard on these issues when we vote!

Nationally

3 Reasons Why the Presidency Matters to Latinos

National Emergencies

Appointments

Executive Powers

The president can require companies and manufacturers to prioritize the production of goods needed during a national emergency. During a pandemic, that could mean the production  of masks and protective equipment for essential workers. Latinos are overrepresented in essential industries: they make  up 17% of the workforce, but account for 21% of the country’s essential workers.

Presidents nominate federal
judges, such as members of the U.S. Supreme Court, when there are openings. These judges make decisions on important issues affecting the lives of millions of Americans like voting rights, healthcare and immigration.

The president can enforce laws, treaties, and court rulings; develop federal policies; and prepare the national budget. They also approve or veto acts of Congress and grant pardons. The next president will determine the future of the DACA program, which provides eligible undocumented youth with deferred action from deportation.

Locally

This election is so much more than who will be our next president. On your ballot, you will have an opportunity to vote for local positions like your next mayor or county supervisor. They are the ones making key decisions on the COVID-19 response locally for the Latino community. Local offices are just as important at the national ones!

3 Reasons Why Voting Local Matters to Latinos

Propositions

Local Office

Numbers Matter

In cities like Oakland and San Francisco, voters will decide on local propositions to allow 16-and17-year olds to vote in local elections like school board.

With police budgets on the minds of so many people, positions like mayors, city councils, and sheriffs are responsible for influencing budgets that involve law enforcement.

Local offices rarely see high voter turnout so your participation on the local races really makes a difference.

YOUR VOTE MAKES A DIFFERENCE!

Not only will your vote help determine who represents us in government; your vote will also help decide the outcomes on issues that matter to the Latino community in California!  

This year there are 12 propositions on the ballot. Voters will decide about school funding for schools and local services, affirmative action in college admissions and hiring, and whether to let eligible 17-year-olds vote, among many other issues. Each of these issues will affect Latino youth and their families. We can let our voices be heard on these issues when we vote!

NATIONALLY

3 Reasons Why the Presidency Matters to Latinos

National Emergencies

The president can require companies and manufacturers to prioritize the production of goods needed during a national emergency. During a pandemic, that could mean the production of masks and protective equipment for essential workers. Latinos are overrepresented in essential industries: they make up 17% of the workforce, but account for 21% of the country’s essential workers.

Appointments

Presidents nominate federal judges, such as members of the U.S. Supreme Court, when there are openings. These judges make decisions on important issues affecting the lives of millions of Americans like voting rights, healthcare and immigration.

Executive Powers

The president can enforce laws, treaties, and court rulings; develop federal policies; and prepare the national budget. They also approve or veto acts of Congress and grant pardons. The next president will determine the future of the DACA program, which provides eligible undocumented youth with deferred action from deportation.

LOCALLY

This election is so much more than who will be our next president. On your ballot, you will have an opportunity to vote for local positions like your next mayor or county supervisor. They are the ones making key decisions on the COVID-19 response locally for the Latino community. Local offices are just as important at the national ones!

3 Reasons Why Voting Local Matters to Latinos

Propositions

In cities like Oakland and San Francisco, voters will decide on local propositions to allow 16-and17-year olds to vote in local elections like school board.

Local Office

With police budgets on the minds of so many people, positions like mayors, city councils, and sheriffs are responsible for influencing budgets that involve law enforcement.

Numbers Matter

Local offices rarely see high voter turnout so your participation on the local races really makes a difference.

TALKING TO YOUR FAMILY
ABOUT VOTING

Here are some ideas for your next dinner!

If all Latinos voted, we could change California.
  • Latinos make up 39 percent of the state’s population—that’s 15 million people!  
    • In total there are 7.9 million Latinos eligible to vote in California. That makes us a political force that keeps on growing.
  • A quarter of the state’s small businesses are Latino-owned. We keep California’s economy strong.
Latinos are the present and future of California.
  • Half of all students in K-12 public schools are Latino. The choices we make today will have a profound impact on the next generation.
If you are eligible to vote, do it for those who can’t.
  • Undocumented Californians are not eligible to cast a ballot but that doesn’t mean they’re not also impacted by the policies our elected leaders put in place. If you have the privilege to vote, you can vote for leaders and policies that reflect your values of diversity and inclusion.

TALKING TO YOUR FAMILY
ABOUT VOTING

Here are some ideas for your next dinner!

If all Latinos voted, we could change California.
  • Latinos make up 39 percent of the state’s population—that’s 15 million people!  
    • In total there are 7.9 million Latinos eligible to vote in California. That makes us a political force that keeps on growing.
  • A quarter of the state’s small businesses are Latino-owned. We keep California’s economy strong.
Latinos are the present and future of California.
  • Half of all students in K-12 public schools are Latino. The choices we make today will have a profound impact on the next generation.
If you are eligible to vote, do it for those who can’t.
  • Undocumented Californians are not eligible to cast a ballot but that doesn’t mean they’re not also impacted by the policies our elected leaders put in place. If you have the privilege to vote, you can vote for leaders and policies that reflect your values of diversity and inclusion.